The human side of conflict | EUNewsletter

The human side of conflict

21 December 2012

A photo exhibition, dedicated to the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict, entitled “Different faces, shared hopes. The human side of conflict” opened in Yerevan on 10 December.
It was organised through a peacebuilding project on Nagorno Karabakh implemented by International Alert and financed by the European Union.
The Head of the European Union Delegation Traian Hristea stated: ‘The captured faces of the people represent the human side of the Nagorno-Karabagh conflict; each individual remains above all human beings with his or her right to be what they are, wherever they live, with dignity and in peace. Peace is the most desired solution for the region’.
Hristea added that the exhibition’s opening coincided with human rights day: ‘Today the EU has also received the Nobel Peace Prize, which is a great occasion to remind people throughout the world and in Europe what makes the EU so special. It is a good opportunity to inject new life into the EU’s calls for peace’.

International Alert representative Marina Nagai explained that the original idea was just to invite a British photographer to the region to make some photos for their materials, however:
‘When we saw the slides that Jonathan brought back from the South Caucasus, the faces were so impressive that we thought we should share those images with other people in the region’.

The exhibition was located in the “Moscow” cinema and has lasted till December 17. The entry was free for all comers.

In March-April 2011, International Alert commissioned a series of portraits of people throughout the conflict-torn region from international award-winning photographer Jonathan Banks.

The human side of conflict

A photo exhibition, dedicated to the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict, entitled “Different faces, shared hopes. The human side of conflict” opened in Yerevan on 10 December. It was organised through a peacebuilding project on Nagorno Karabakh implemented by International Alert and financed by the European Union. The Head of the European Union Delegation Traian Hristea stated: ‘The captured faces of the people represent the human side of the Nagorno-Karabagh conflict; each individual remains above all human beings with his or her right to be what they are, wherever they live, with dignity and in peace. Peace is the most desired solution for the region’. Hristea added that the exhibition’s opening coincided with human rights day: ‘Today the EU has also received the Nobel Peace Prize, which is a great occasion to remind people throughout the world and in Europe what makes the EU so special. It is a good opportunity to inject new life into the EU’s calls for peace’. International Alert representative Marina Nagai explained that the original idea was just to invite a British photographer to the region to make some photos for their materials, however: ‘When we saw the slides that Jonathan brought back from the South Caucasus, the faces were so impressive that we thought we should share those images with other people in the region’. The exhibition was located in the “Moscow” cinema and has lasted till December 17. The entry was free for all comers. In March-April 2011, International Alert commissioned a series of portraits of people throughout the conflict-torn region from international award-winning photographer Jonathan Banks. [gallery link="file"]