Shaping cultural policy in Dilijan | EUNewsletter

Shaping cultural policy in Dilijan

19 December 2012
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On 9 November an EU-funded culture project organised a workshop to initiate local dialogue and directly involve relevant organisations in shaping cultural policy and methodology in Dilijan. Participants included Dilijan residents and nearby villages’ cultural institutions, the village head of Gosh, and representatives of the Teghut and Hovq communities, among others.
‘This workshop is the first attempt by stakeholders to raise issues related to the preservation of cultural heritage, and to try to propose possible solutions from their standpoint and develop pilot projects,’ stated the project coordinator, Ecotourism Association President Zhanna Galian.
International experts, architects Katarina Prada (Romania), Federico Escobar (Spain) and Sarhat Petrossian (Armenia), spoke about appreciation of the cultural heritage of small historical centres.

Referring to the peculiarities of the problem in Armenia, Petrossian said: ‘In Armenia, 90% of heritage is in deep canyons and mountains; therefore, accessibility issues arise. In addition to actual construction project developments on historical areas and buildings, it is also necessary to develop renovation projects, including the repairing of roads, drainage systems, etc.’

Workshop participants also stressed the importance of initiating activities directed towards preserving “intangible” heritage (song, dance, cuisine, and other traditions). The European experts noted that people visiting small historic centres, such as Goshavank, were interested in local traditions and cultural heritage. ‘Tourists expect to experience t he very conditions in which the residents of the village live and eat food typical of that location,’ stated Escobar.

Workshop participants also made an attempt to identify the primary challenges, priorities and resources needed in this field.

The workshop was part of the “VIVA EAST” project, which carries out research on best practices in the field of long-term cultural and environmental heritage re-evaluation in Eastern Europe. The project is aimed at transferring best practices for small historic centres to different countries: Romania (in the Hartibaciu Valley region), Armenia (in Tavush marz), and Moldova (in Cahul county).

The project is funded by the European Union through the Eastern Partnership Culture Programme and implemented by the Romanian Asociatiapentru Tranzitie Urbana, as leading partner, and the Armenian Ecotourism Association, the Cross-Border Cooperation and European Integration Agency, the government of the Republic of Moldova, and the Dicar Department of the Italian Politecnico di Bari.

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Shaping cultural policy in Dilijan

On 9 November an EU-funded culture project organised a workshop to initiate local dialogue and directly involve relevant organisations in shaping cultural policy and methodology in Dilijan. Participants included Dilijan residents and nearby villages’ cultural institutions, the village head of Gosh, and representatives of the Teghut and Hovq communities, among others. ‘This workshop is the first attempt by stakeholders to raise issues related to the preservation of cultural heritage, and to try to propose possible solutions from their standpoint and develop pilot projects,’ stated the project coordinator, Ecotourism Association President Zhanna Galian. International experts, architects Katarina Prada (Romania), Federico Escobar (Spain) and Sarhat Petrossian (Armenia), spoke about appreciation of the cultural heritage of small historical centres. Referring to the peculiarities of the problem in Armenia, Petrossian said: ‘In Armenia, 90% of heritage is in deep canyons and mountains; therefore, accessibility issues arise. In addition to actual construction project developments on historical areas and buildings, it is also necessary to develop renovation projects, including the repairing of roads, drainage systems, etc.’ Workshop participants also stressed the importance of initiating activities directed towards preserving “intangible” heritage (song, dance, cuisine, and other traditions). The European experts noted that people visiting small historic centres, such as Goshavank, were interested in local traditions and cultural heritage. ‘Tourists expect to experience t he very conditions in which the residents of the village live and eat food typical of that location,’ stated Escobar. Workshop participants also made an attempt to identify the primary challenges, priorities and resources needed in this field. The workshop was part of the “VIVA EAST” project, which carries out research on best practices in the field of long-term cultural and environmental heritage re-evaluation in Eastern Europe. The project is aimed at transferring best practices for small historic centres to different countries: Romania (in the Hartibaciu Valley region), Armenia (in Tavush marz), and Moldova (in Cahul county). The project is funded by the European Union through the Eastern Partnership Culture Programme and implemented by the Romanian Asociatiapentru Tranzitie Urbana, as leading partner, and the Armenian Ecotourism Association, the Cross-Border Cooperation and European Integration Agency, the government of the Republic of Moldova, and the Dicar Department of the Italian Politecnico di Bari. vivaeastpart.eu [gallery exclude="2821" link="file"]