Reducing disaster risks on IDDR | EUNewsletter

Reducing disaster risks on IDDR

5 November 2013

An event dedicated to the International Day for Disaster Reduction (IDDR) was held on 14 October 2013 at Yerevan School #14 for children with visual impairments. This year IDDR is focusing on the one billion people in the world who live with some form of disability.
The event, called “Living with Disabilities and Disaster”, was organised by Save the Children and UNICEF in collaboration with the Disaster Risk Reduction National Platform (DRRNP). Save the Children is already implementing an Inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction project in School #14, funded by the Disaster Preparedness Programme of the European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid Department (DIPECHO).
Minister of Emergency Situations Armen Yeritsyan, the Ambassador of the EU Delegation to Armenia, Traian Hristea, as well as representatives from DRRNP, UNICEF, Save the Children, OXFAM, Armenian Red Cross Society, World Vision and other international and local organisations involved in the programme, were invited to the event.
Hristea stated that the EU supported disaster preparedness efforts around the world because these efforts saved lives and reduced the impact of natural hazards in the future: ‘The European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid Department has dedicated a specific programme to disaster preparedness with DIPECHO. It has financed projects in some of the world’s most disaster-prone regions since 1996. The South Caucasus is highly exposed to natural disasters and their dangerous consequences. Armenia is particularly prone to disasters; the Spitak earthquake was a devastating example’.
DIPECHO-funded projects in Armenia target the regions of Shirak, Lori, Gegharkuniq, Vayots Dzor and Yerevan. Activities are directed in the following directions: strengthening the capacity of local communities to identify and address the needs of the most vulnerable people in disaster risk reduction; reflecting on the needs and rights of the most vulnerable children in disaster risk reduction policy; building the capacity of children and schools in hazard-prone areas to be better prepared; strengthening cooperation with leading agencies, governmental authorities, the DRRNP, and other relevant regional structures in the South Caucasus in the sphere of disaster risk reduction.

Yeritsyan stated that the Armenian government needed to pay particular attention to the 189,700 disabled people living in Armenia: ‘Today, 26 people with disabilities work at the Minister of Emergency Situations . We approached them personally, helping them with their education, their integration into social life and, of course, their involvement in disaster risk reduction activities. We support those people who need our help.’

Reducing disaster risks on IDDR

An event dedicated to the International Day for Disaster Reduction (IDDR) was held on 14 October 2013 at Yerevan School #14 for children with visual impairments. This year IDDR is focusing on the one billion people in the world who live with some form of disability. The event, called “Living with Disabilities and Disaster”, was organised by Save the Children and UNICEF in collaboration with the Disaster Risk Reduction National Platform (DRRNP). Save the Children is already implementing an Inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction project in School #14, funded by the Disaster Preparedness Programme of the European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid Department (DIPECHO). Minister of Emergency Situations Armen Yeritsyan, the Ambassador of the EU Delegation to Armenia, Traian Hristea, as well as representatives from DRRNP, UNICEF, Save the Children, OXFAM, Armenian Red Cross Society, World Vision and other international and local organisations involved in the programme, were invited to the event. Hristea stated that the EU supported disaster preparedness efforts around the world because these efforts saved lives and reduced the impact of natural hazards in the future: ‘The European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid Department has dedicated a specific programme to disaster preparedness with DIPECHO. It has financed projects in some of the world’s most disaster-prone regions since 1996. The South Caucasus is highly exposed to natural disasters and their dangerous consequences. Armenia is particularly prone to disasters; the Spitak earthquake was a devastating example’. DIPECHO-funded projects in Armenia target the regions of Shirak, Lori, Gegharkuniq, Vayots Dzor and Yerevan. Activities are directed in the following directions: strengthening the capacity of local communities to identify and address the needs of the most vulnerable people in disaster risk reduction; reflecting on the needs and rights of the most vulnerable children in disaster risk reduction policy; building the capacity of children and schools in hazard-prone areas to be better prepared; strengthening cooperation with leading agencies, governmental authorities, the DRRNP, and other relevant regional structures in the South Caucasus in the sphere of disaster risk reduction. Yeritsyan stated that the Armenian government needed to pay particular attention to the 189,700 disabled people living in Armenia: ‘Today, 26 people with disabilities work at the Minister of Emergency Situations . We approached them personally, helping them with their education, their integration into social life and, of course, their involvement in disaster risk reduction activities. We support those people who need our help.’