ing t | EUNewsletter

ing t

11 February 2013

The Institute for Contemporary Art screened a documentary called “Reclaiming the city” in Yerevan within the framework of the EU funded “SPACES”, a three-year project promoting artistic and cultural action in the public space.
The director of the film, Stefan Rusu, explained that the film was a commission of the 7th Berlin Biennale International Festival.
‘I was invited by the curators to do a film about Berlin, and how it changed after the fall of the wall’.
The film depicted two ideas: how the city had changed, and how the art community had corresponded to these changes.

‘Berlin is somehow synchronised with the familiar processes of transformational society; it is fundamentally linked not only to visual, but also profound societal transformation. It is synchronised with ongoing processes in former Soviet countries, which is why it is quite important for me to show this film,’ explained Rusu.

Producer and film maker Rusu, based in both Chisinau, Moldova and Bucharest, Romania, was mainly interested in transformations in the post-socialist context: ‘The Eastern Bloc in central Europe was democratised after the fall of the Berlin wall and the former Soviet countries became independent and brought about huge change after 1991’.

Besides Yerevan, the film has already been screened in Kiev, Vilnius, Minsk and Chisinau. It will also be presented in Tbilisi and Bucharest.

www.spacesproject.net

ing t

The Institute for Contemporary Art screened a documentary called “Reclaiming the city” in Yerevan within the framework of the EU funded “SPACES”, a three-year project promoting artistic and cultural action in the public space. The director of the film, Stefan Rusu, explained that the film was a commission of the 7th Berlin Biennale International Festival. ‘I was invited by the curators to do a film about Berlin, and how it changed after the fall of the wall’. The film depicted two ideas: how the city had changed, and how the art community had corresponded to these changes. ‘Berlin is somehow synchronised with the familiar processes of transformational society; it is fundamentally linked not only to visual, but also profound societal transformation. It is synchronised with ongoing processes in former Soviet countries, which is why it is quite important for me to show this film,’ explained Rusu. Producer and film maker Rusu, based in both Chisinau, Moldova and Bucharest, Romania, was mainly interested in transformations in the post-socialist context: ‘The Eastern Bloc in central Europe was democratised after the fall of the Berlin wall and the former Soviet countries became independent and brought about huge change after 1991’. Besides Yerevan, the film has already been screened in Kiev, Vilnius, Minsk and Chisinau. It will also be presented in Tbilisi and Bucharest. www.spacesproject.net