Re-evaluating tangible heritage | EUNewsletter

Re-evaluating tangible heritage

15 May 2013

Within the framework of the EU-funded VIVA EAST project, a seminar and a workshop called “Tangible Heritage of Small Historic Centres” were organised on 18-19 April in Dilijan.
The VIVA EAST project researches best practices in the field of long-term cultural and environmental heritage re-evaluation in Eastern Europe. It covers all countries of the Eastern Partnership; however, this part of the project is aimed at developing and applying best practices for small historic centres in the different geographical areas of Tavush (Armenia), Hartibaciu Valley (Romania), and Cahul (Moldova).
Local experts spoke about the state of intangible heritage in Armenia and international experts presented the situation in Romania and Moldova. Presentations were followed by a roundtable discussion on EU best practices about contributing to intangible heritage in order to develop historic centres’ cultural systems.
The VIVA EAST methodology is to establish an international network to facilitate cooperation and professional and cultural exchanges throughout the Eastern Partnership region. The project’s methodology will concern cultural and environmental heritage valorisation and engaging local stakeholders in spatial, cultural and tourism activities.

Project Manager Josefina Lopez Galdeano explained that the project had been devised to help the countries manage their work on rural heritage more effectively: ‘The idea is to work in a way in which local people profit from their heritage resources, both tangible and intangible. We can create sustainable local development at the same time as preserving that heritage’.

The project is implemented by the Asociatia Pentru Tranzitie Urbana, Romania, as leading partner. The partners are the Armenian Ecotourism Association, the Cross-Border Cooperation and European Integration Agency of the Republic of Moldova, and the Dicar Department, Politecnico di Bari, Italy.

More information about the project is available on the website www.vivaeastpart.eu.

Re-evaluating tangible heritage

Within the framework of the EU-funded VIVA EAST project, a seminar and a workshop called “Tangible Heritage of Small Historic Centres” were organised on 18-19 April in Dilijan. The VIVA EAST project researches best practices in the field of long-term cultural and environmental heritage re-evaluation in Eastern Europe. It covers all countries of the Eastern Partnership; however, this part of the project is aimed at developing and applying best practices for small historic centres in the different geographical areas of Tavush (Armenia), Hartibaciu Valley (Romania), and Cahul (Moldova). Local experts spoke about the state of intangible heritage in Armenia and international experts presented the situation in Romania and Moldova. Presentations were followed by a roundtable discussion on EU best practices about contributing to intangible heritage in order to develop historic centres’ cultural systems. The VIVA EAST methodology is to establish an international network to facilitate cooperation and professional and cultural exchanges throughout the Eastern Partnership region. The project’s methodology will concern cultural and environmental heritage valorisation and engaging local stakeholders in spatial, cultural and tourism activities. Project Manager Josefina Lopez Galdeano explained that the project had been devised to help the countries manage their work on rural heritage more effectively: ‘The idea is to work in a way in which local people profit from their heritage resources, both tangible and intangible. We can create sustainable local development at the same time as preserving that heritage’. The project is implemented by the Asociatia Pentru Tranzitie Urbana, Romania, as leading partner. The partners are the Armenian Ecotourism Association, the Cross-Border Cooperation and European Integration Agency of the Republic of Moldova, and the Dicar Department, Politecnico di Bari, Italy. More information about the project is available on the website www.vivaeastpart.eu. [gallery link="file"]