Raising the bar of Armenian higher education through EU support | EUNewsletter

Raising the bar of Armenian higher education through EU support

4 July 2016
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For the past two years, the European Union has supported Armenia in improving its higher education to make it more compatible with higher education in Europe. The closing conference of the Empowerment of Tertiary-level Education twinning project took place on 1 July 2016 and was attended by Armenian educational experts and governmental representatives, as well as representatives from the international community.
Project results include that the Armenian legislation on higher education and the national qualifications framework have been reviewed. Moreover, the capacity of the Armenian tertiary education system to implement the Bologna reforms has been raised and Armenian higher education institutions have been supported to streamline their educational programmes in line with Bologna principles and to ensure compatibility with labour market requirements. During the project, 43 experts from Finland and Germany conducted missions in Armenia to review national legislation on higher education, to provide training, and to exchange experience with their Armenian counterparts.
The Head of the EU Delegation to Armenia, Ambassador Piotr Świtalski, attended the event and highlighted educational links between Armenia and the EU: ‘Education is very important for the EU; Armenia can count on our support and cooperation to bring the Armenian educational system closer to the European system, and closer to the requirements of the 21st century. I think that education is a field where the integral link between Armenia and the European family is so strong and visible. Armenia is a nation of rich culture and education; for generations Armenia has considered this a very important asset. Armenia is a country of book lovers, a country where books have almost a religious value. When you look at the assets Armenia has to boost its development, to create a modern, prosperous society, education is one of the answers that instinctively comes to mind. Investment in education is paramount’.
The Armenian Minister of Education and Science, Levon Mktrchyan, said that the work carried out during the project would influence educational initiatives: ‘When we speak about the entry of European civilisation and values into our country, we can, first of all, refer to education and science. This twinning project’s symbolic format had a big effect on perspectives in these areas. It is no coincidence that the two selected partner countries can be proud of their educational format, Finland and Germany. For me, the Finnish model of education is of a very high standard, with smooth transitions between different educational levels and a proportionate system. When we started the reform process for basic education, the Finnish model was a principal reference point. Therefore, the advisory presence of the best Finnish experience was very important for us. Our German partners transferred their powerful and rich educational tradition, the structure of which is more familiar to us, as well as strict criteria of quality and discipline, especially in higher education’.
More than 200 teaching and administrative staff, as well as students from Armenian higher education institutions and specialists from Armenian National Centre for Professional Education Quality Assurance (ANQA) participated in 25 training sessions. The sessions covered topics such as the design of learning outcomes, student assessment and grading, credit transfer and accumulation, accreditation, and quality assurance. Selected specialists from the Ministry of Education and Science of Armenia and ANQA also participated in two study visits to Germany, Finland and Estonia.
The project was financed by the European Union with a budget of €1 million and a duration of 24 months. It was implemented by the Ministry of Education and Science of Armenia, the Finnish Education Evaluation Centre, and the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Around 60 experts from Finland, Germany and Estonia contributed to the implementation of the project. Armenian higher education institutions and ANQA were also highly involved in the project.

Raising the bar of Armenian higher education through EU support

For the past two years, the European Union has supported Armenia in improving its higher education to make it more compatible with higher education in Europe. The closing conference of the Empowerment of Tertiary-level Education twinning project took place on 1 July 2016 and was attended by Armenian educational experts and governmental representatives, as well as representatives from the international community. Project results include that the Armenian legislation on higher education and the national qualifications framework have been reviewed. Moreover, the capacity of the Armenian tertiary education system to implement the Bologna reforms has been raised and Armenian higher education institutions have been supported to streamline their educational programmes in line with Bologna principles and to ensure compatibility with labour market requirements. During the project, 43 experts from Finland and Germany conducted missions in Armenia to review national legislation on higher education, to provide training, and to exchange experience with their Armenian counterparts. The Head of the EU Delegation to Armenia, Ambassador Piotr Świtalski, attended the event and highlighted educational links between Armenia and the EU: 'Education is very important for the EU; Armenia can count on our support and cooperation to bring the Armenian educational system closer to the European system, and closer to the requirements of the 21st century. I think that education is a field where the integral link between Armenia and the European family is so strong and visible. Armenia is a nation of rich culture and education; for generations Armenia has considered this a very important asset. Armenia is a country of book lovers, a country where books have almost a religious value. When you look at the assets Armenia has to boost its development, to create a modern, prosperous society, education is one of the answers that instinctively comes to mind. Investment in education is paramount'. The Armenian Minister of Education and Science, Levon Mktrchyan, said that the work carried out during the project would influence educational initiatives: 'When we speak about the entry of European civilisation and values into our country, we can, first of all, refer to education and science. This twinning project’s symbolic format had a big effect on perspectives in these areas. It is no coincidence that the two selected partner countries can be proud of their educational format, Finland and Germany. For me, the Finnish model of education is of a very high standard, with smooth transitions between different educational levels and a proportionate system. When we started the reform process for basic education, the Finnish model was a principal reference point. Therefore, the advisory presence of the best Finnish experience was very important for us. Our German partners transferred their powerful and rich educational tradition, the structure of which is more familiar to us, as well as strict criteria of quality and discipline, especially in higher education'. More than 200 teaching and administrative staff, as well as students from Armenian higher education institutions and specialists from Armenian National Centre for Professional Education Quality Assurance (ANQA) participated in 25 training sessions. The sessions covered topics such as the design of learning outcomes, student assessment and grading, credit transfer and accumulation, accreditation, and quality assurance. Selected specialists from the Ministry of Education and Science of Armenia and ANQA also participated in two study visits to Germany, Finland and Estonia. The project was financed by the European Union with a budget of €1 million and a duration of 24 months. It was implemented by the Ministry of Education and Science of Armenia, the Finnish Education Evaluation Centre, and the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Around 60 experts from Finland, Germany and Estonia contributed to the implementation of the project. Armenian higher education institutions and ANQA were also highly involved in the project.