Persistent organic threats | EUNewsletter

Persistent organic threats

3 October 2011

On 31 May 2011 an international conference marking the tenth anniversary of the Stockholm Convention on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) took place in Tsaghkadzor. The results of the EU funded project “Scaling up experience in improvement of chemical safety to contribute to poverty reduction in rural Armenia” were also presented.
International and national experts together with government and civil society representatives, discussed the threats to and solutions for environmental protection. While pointing out the main hotspots polluted by POPs, including the chemical waste site in Nubarashen, Yerevan, the conference participants attested that pending issues could be solved through interaction between governmental bodies, experts and NGOs.
“This conference is not only devoted to environmental threats”, said Jean-Christophe Gayrand, the Head of Operations of the EU Delegation to Armenia, “but it is also a platform to establish a wide range of agricultural programmes which could be carried out together as international projects. Our colleagues from the Czech Republic, Ukraine and Belarus can assist jointly in work and research”.
This project is part of the efforts to help Armenia implement the Stockholm Convention, a global treaty to protect human health and the environment from highly dangerous chemicals, and bring about sustainable solutions through the close co-operation of NGOs, governmental bodies and experts in the field.
The conference was organised by the Arnika Association from the Czech Republic and the Armenian Women for Health and a Healthy Environment NGO, with financial support from the European Union and the OSCE Office in Yerevan.

Persistent organic threats

On 31 May 2011 an international conference marking the tenth anniversary of the Stockholm Convention on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) took place in Tsaghkadzor. The results of the EU funded project "Scaling up experience in improvement of chemical safety to contribute to poverty reduction in rural Armenia" were also presented. International and national experts together with government and civil society representatives, discussed the threats to and solutions for environmental protection. While pointing out the main hotspots polluted by POPs, including the chemical waste site in Nubarashen, Yerevan, the conference participants attested that pending issues could be solved through interaction between governmental bodies, experts and NGOs. "This conference is not only devoted to environmental threats", said Jean-Christophe Gayrand, the Head of Operations of the EU Delegation to Armenia, "but it is also a platform to establish a wide range of agricultural programmes which could be carried out together as international projects. Our colleagues from the Czech Republic, Ukraine and Belarus can assist jointly in work and research". This project is part of the efforts to help Armenia implement the Stockholm Convention, a global treaty to protect human health and the environment from highly dangerous chemicals, and bring about sustainable solutions through the close co-operation of NGOs, governmental bodies and experts in the field. The conference was organised by the Arnika Association from the Czech Republic and the Armenian Women for Health and a Healthy Environment NGO, with financial support from the European Union and the OSCE Office in Yerevan.