Key to borders: Visa | EUNewsletter

Key to borders: Visa

2 December 2010

People, countries, borders. In order to cross borders and enter other countries, people often need a visa. Getting a visa might seem complicated, but knowing the procedure is helpful in the process. The first important thing, when applying for a visa, is to find out what documents are necessary and when they should be provided. The best source of complete information is usually the Embassy or the Consulate of the country to be visited (prospective visa seekers can phone, visit or find information on their official website).

Each country defines its visa procedure, but there are also multilateral agreements like the Schengen one. Below you may find useful information on the Schengen visa:

The Schengen visa is a visa allowing entry and travel throughout the Schengen area. It is not an EU visa. The creation of the Schengen area has two objectives: to remove internal borders between the Schengen countries and to promote joint efforts against international organized crime.

The Schengen area consists of the countries that signed the Schengen agreement: The countries of the Schengen area are Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain and Sweden.

Note: Except Norway and Iceland all Schengen area countries are EU Member States. However, not all EU Member States are within the Schengen area.

The Schengen area and cooperation are founded on the Schengen Agreement of 1985. The Schengen area represents a territory where the free movement of persons is guaranteed. The signatory states to the agreement have abolished all internal borders in lieu of a single external border. Here common rules and procedures are applied with regard to visas for short stays, asylum requests and border controls. Simultaneously, to guarantee security within the Schengen area, cooperation and coordination between police services and judicial authorities have been stepped up.

Schengen Visa Types

Schengen Airport transit visas (Type “A”, as indicated on the visa sticker). This visa is required for nationals of certain third countries who are flying to another third country but making a stopover or transfer in an airport of a Schengen State.

Schengen transit visa (Type “B”, as indicated on the visa sticker) is issued to enable you to pass through the territory of one or more Schengen member states. It is issued for 15 days. It enables to apply for one or two entries into the Schengen area.

Schengen short-stay visa (Type “C”) is issued to enable you to do shopping, have rest, visit relatives or make business trips, etc., on the territory of the Schengen area. It is issued for 90 days. It can be a single entry visa (enabling to enter once to the Schengen area) or a multiple-entry visa.

Schengen long-stay visa (Type “D”) is issued by the state embassy enabling you to reside in the mentioned state if you are intended to stay there for some reasons (job, education, marriage, etc.) for more than 90 days. It enables to apply for a multiple-entry right.

To apply for a visa:

– complete and sign a visa application form.
– Schengen States use a standard form.
– present a current passport whose date of expiry is later than the end of the proposed stay;
– describe the purpose and circumstances of your visit specify means of transport;
– demonstrate sufficient means of subsistence for the proposed journey and for the return;
– demonstrate that you have travel insurance for the trip.

Note: For a Schengen visa, Armenian citizens cannot present a passport valid for more than 10 years. Besides, the passport must have minimum of 2 blank pages for entry visas and the passport’s expiry date should be at least three months after the end of the applicant’s expected stay in the Schengen area.

Key to borders: Visa

People, countries, borders. In order to cross borders and enter other countries, people often need a visa. Getting a visa might seem complicated, but knowing the procedure is helpful in the process. The first important thing, when applying for a visa, is to find out what documents are necessary and when they should be provided. The best source of complete information is usually the Embassy or the Consulate of the country to be visited (prospective visa seekers can phone, visit or find information on their official website). Each country defines its visa procedure, but there are also multilateral agreements like the Schengen one. Below you may find useful information on the Schengen visa: The Schengen visa is a visa allowing entry and travel throughout the Schengen area. It is not an EU visa. The creation of the Schengen area has two objectives: to remove internal borders between the Schengen countries and to promote joint efforts against international organized crime. The Schengen area consists of the countries that signed the Schengen agreement: The countries of the Schengen area are Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain and Sweden. Note: Except Norway and Iceland all Schengen area countries are EU Member States. However, not all EU Member States are within the Schengen area. The Schengen area and cooperation are founded on the Schengen Agreement of 1985. The Schengen area represents a territory where the free movement of persons is guaranteed. The signatory states to the agreement have abolished all internal borders in lieu of a single external border. Here common rules and procedures are applied with regard to visas for short stays, asylum requests and border controls. Simultaneously, to guarantee security within the Schengen area, cooperation and coordination between police services and judicial authorities have been stepped up.

Schengen Visa Types

Schengen Airport transit visas (Type "A", as indicated on the visa sticker). This visa is required for nationals of certain third countries who are flying to another third country but making a stopover or transfer in an airport of a Schengen State. Schengen transit visa (Type “B”, as indicated on the visa sticker) is issued to enable you to pass through the territory of one or more Schengen member states. It is issued for 15 days. It enables to apply for one or two entries into the Schengen area. Schengen short-stay visa (Type “C”) is issued to enable you to do shopping, have rest, visit relatives or make business trips, etc., on the territory of the Schengen area. It is issued for 90 days. It can be a single entry visa (enabling to enter once to the Schengen area) or a multiple-entry visa. Schengen long-stay visa (Type “D”) is issued by the state embassy enabling you to reside in the mentioned state if you are intended to stay there for some reasons (job, education, marriage, etc.) for more than 90 days. It enables to apply for a multiple-entry right. To apply for a visa:

- complete and sign a visa application form. - Schengen States use a standard form. - present a current passport whose date of expiry is later than the end of the proposed stay; - describe the purpose and circumstances of your visit specify means of transport; - demonstrate sufficient means of subsistence for the proposed journey and for the return; - demonstrate that you have travel insurance for the trip.

Note: For a Schengen visa, Armenian citizens cannot present a passport valid for more than 10 years. Besides, the passport must have minimum of 2 blank pages for entry visas and the passport's expiry date should be at least three months after the end of the applicant’s expected stay in the Schengen area.