Human rights and democratisation in 6 countries | EUNewsletter

Human rights and democratisation in 6 countries

9 October 2013

The 2011/12 Human Rights and Democratisation yearbook for the Eastern Partnership region has been published with the support of the EU. The yearbook provides a comprehensive analysis of the status of human rights and democratisation in the 6 countries which make up the EU Eastern Partnership: Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Moldova and Ukraine. It contains 5 chapters, each of which touches upon the problems of democratisation and related EU funded projects implemented in the region.
The book was written by Benjamin James Barnard, an independent expert from the Human Rights Centre of the University of Essex, UK, and waslaunched at Yerevan State University inthe Robert Schuman Hall ofthe Centre for European Studies.
The book’s publication is the result of the Master’s Programme on Human Rights and Democratization in Armenia, Ukraine, Belarus and Moldova, fully financed by the European Union and implemented by Yerevan State University as lead partner (http://regionalmaster.net). The launch was attended by the Head of the Political Section of the EU Delegation to Armenia, Dirk Lorenz, representatives of diplomatic missions in Armenia, and international and non-governmental organisations.

In his welcoming speech, Lorenz emphasised that Armenia had made progress in democratisation and human rights: ‘The European Union is implementing serious programmes in Armenia and other partnership countries to ensure the development of democratisation. Armenia is cooperating with partner countries in this sphere, which is much appreciated. I hope that this policy will continue’. During a brief presentation on the book, Arevik Anapiosyan from the Centre for European Studies , noted that the ittouched on all problems affecting partnership countries, includingpolitical, economic, and social issues.

The director of the Centre for European Studies, Artur Ghazinyan, stated that universities in Armenia, Ukraine, Moldova and Belarus had all been involved in compiling the yearbook. Stressing the importance of this research for specialists, students and the general public, he saidthat furtherpublications were planned.

Human rights and democratisation in 6 countries

The 2011/12 Human Rights and Democratisation yearbook for the Eastern Partnership region has been published with the support of the EU. The yearbook provides a comprehensive analysis of the status of human rights and democratisation in the 6 countries which make up the EU Eastern Partnership: Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Moldova and Ukraine. It contains 5 chapters, each of which touches upon the problems of democratisation and related EU funded projects implemented in the region. The book was written by Benjamin James Barnard, an independent expert from the Human Rights Centre of the University of Essex, UK, and waslaunched at Yerevan State University inthe Robert Schuman Hall ofthe Centre for European Studies. The book's publication is the result of the Master's Programme on Human Rights and Democratization in Armenia, Ukraine, Belarus and Moldova, fully financed by the European Union and implemented by Yerevan State University as lead partner (http://regionalmaster.net). The launch was attended by the Head of the Political Section of the EU Delegation to Armenia, Dirk Lorenz, representatives of diplomatic missions in Armenia, and international and non-governmental organisations. In his welcoming speech, Lorenz emphasised that Armenia had made progress in democratisation and human rights: ‘The European Union is implementing serious programmes in Armenia and other partnership countries to ensure the development of democratisation. Armenia is cooperating with partner countries in this sphere, which is much appreciated. I hope that this policy will continue’. During a brief presentation on the book, Arevik Anapiosyan from the Centre for European Studies , noted that the ittouched on all problems affecting partnership countries, includingpolitical, economic, and social issues. The director of the Centre for European Studies, Artur Ghazinyan, stated that universities in Armenia, Ukraine, Moldova and Belarus had all been involved in compiling the yearbook. Stressing the importance of this research for specialists, students and the general public, he saidthat furtherpublications were planned.