Fighting against corruption | EUNewsletter

Fighting against corruption

4 July 2013

The closing seminar of the “Situation Analyses of Public Sector Corruption of Armenia” project was conducted on 20 June, 2013. The objective of the EU-funded project was to support the EU Delegation to Armenia in better understanding anti-corruption policies and actions in Armenia and in offering recommendations.
The event was attended by the Armenian Prime Minister, Tigran Sargsyan, the Head of the EU Delegation to Armenia, Traian Hristea, and others.
The Prime Minister stressed that his participation in this event was proof that the Armenian Government paid great attention to the implementation of effective anti-corruption projects in the country. According to him, the anti-corruption strategy project that had been developed with the direct participation of EU experts had yielded positive incomes: ‘In particular, we have made a political decision based on European experts’ feedback – for each year we must make 3 clear targets, a clear action plan, undertake professional analyses of the reasons which cause corruption and of the measures needed to highlight and tackle the problem’.

Sargsyan went on to say that another sphere which had benefited from EU assistance was the Unified Registry of Enterprises and Introduction of the Electronic System: ‘This has enabled us to minimise corruption risks in Armenia. Today it is possible to register a company in Armenia within 15 minutes without leaving the house. This has created a very favourable environment for doing business’.
Within the framework of the project, which lasted from January-June 2013, situation analyses of all actors, structures and direct actions in anti-corruption processes in Armenia were conducted. Experts assessed Armenia’s 2009-2012 anti-corruption strategy and action plan, and then developed a package of recommendations.

Hristea stated that anti-corruption is very important for ensuring the appropriate use of EU assistance: ‘Over the next three years, together with the Armenian authorities, we have made a commitment that will cover €150 million, which will be channeled through the treasury of the Ministry of Finance’.

Hristea stated that, in recent years, the Armenian political leadership had regularly expressed its readiness to fight corruption, and that several high-level dismissals as a result of corrupt practices in 2012 had been an indication of its resolve. He went on to say, however, that, according to the 2012 Corruption Perception Index, Armenia continues to have high levels of both endemic and systemic corruption, and that, therefore, the implementation of anti-corruption policies and laws remained a major challenge and required enhancement.

Team leader Londa Esadze presented the 400-page project report, which includes a situation analysis and recommendations.

Fighting against corruption

The closing seminar of the “Situation Analyses of Public Sector Corruption of Armenia” project was conducted on 20 June, 2013. The objective of the EU-funded project was to support the EU Delegation to Armenia in better understanding anti-corruption policies and actions in Armenia and in offering recommendations. The event was attended by the Armenian Prime Minister, Tigran Sargsyan, the Head of the EU Delegation to Armenia, Traian Hristea, and others. The Prime Minister stressed that his participation in this event was proof that the Armenian Government paid great attention to the implementation of effective anti-corruption projects in the country. According to him, the anti-corruption strategy project that had been developed with the direct participation of EU experts had yielded positive incomes: ‘In particular, we have made a political decision based on European experts’ feedback – for each year we must make 3 clear targets, a clear action plan, undertake professional analyses of the reasons which cause corruption and of the measures needed to highlight and tackle the problem’. Sargsyan went on to say that another sphere which had benefited from EU assistance was the Unified Registry of Enterprises and Introduction of the Electronic System: ‘This has enabled us to minimise corruption risks in Armenia. Today it is possible to register a company in Armenia within 15 minutes without leaving the house. This has created a very favourable environment for doing business’. Within the framework of the project, which lasted from January-June 2013, situation analyses of all actors, structures and direct actions in anti-corruption processes in Armenia were conducted. Experts assessed Armenia’s 2009-2012 anti-corruption strategy and action plan, and then developed a package of recommendations. Hristea stated that anti-corruption is very important for ensuring the appropriate use of EU assistance: ‘Over the next three years, together with the Armenian authorities, we have made a commitment that will cover €150 million, which will be channeled through the treasury of the Ministry of Finance’. Hristea stated that, in recent years, the Armenian political leadership had regularly expressed its readiness to fight corruption, and that several high-level dismissals as a result of corrupt practices in 2012 had been an indication of its resolve. He went on to say, however, that, according to the 2012 Corruption Perception Index, Armenia continues to have high levels of both endemic and systemic corruption, and that, therefore, the implementation of anti-corruption policies and laws remained a major challenge and required enhancement. Team leader Londa Esadze presented the 400-page project report, which includes a situation analysis and recommendations.