Fight against Corruption in the System of Public Administration | EUNewsletter

Fight against Corruption in the System of Public Administration

8 May 2014

On 29 April 2014, a working meeting was held in the “Picasso Hall” of the Best Western Hotel in Yerevan, aimed at discussing the “Presentation of the Concept on “Fight against Corruption in the System of Public Administration”” and at launching of the dialogue between the government and the civil society on the future strategy and its implementation. The meeting was organised by the “Freedom of Information Centre” NGO in cooperation with “Armenian Young Lawyers Association”.
The President of the “Freedom of Information Centre”, Shushan Doydoyan, expressed her enthusiasm that the concept on “Fight against Corruption in the System of Public Administration” has finally been approved by the government. She was confident that this concept would serve as a huge step towards forming more effective civil society and strengthening democracy.
The First Deputy Minister of Justice of the RA, Grigor Muradyan, said that this document would sum up transparency, openness and welfare activities undertaken during recent years, including over 50 laws and judicial statements. He went on to say that Armenia had registered noticeable progress in overcoming corruption, and that it now it occupied second place after Georgia in the Corruption Perception Index.
The Head of the Cooperation Section of the EU Delegation in Armenia, Hoa-Binh Adjemian, said that the most important goal of this project was to build a strong economy and to fight poverty. He noted that fighting poverty was very high on the EU agenda, and that eliminating corruption was the first major step towards this it: ‘We want to ensure that EU money will help to improve the lives of people of Armenia. It is not meant to enrich a happy few, we rather want civil society to raise its capacity to monitor and advise the government’.
Karen Zadoyan, the President of the “Armenian Young Lawyers Association”, said that they had done their best to ensure the theoretical components of the project. According to Zadoyan, the concept has three components: the first is to build an institute for maintaining the rights of people providing information; the second is the creation of single, independent anticorruption agency; the third is combating illegal enrichment in Armenia or discussing its possibility: ‘We need to calculate all possible risks and benefits in order to gain maximum efficiency’.
The project is aimed at increasing the role of civil society organisations (CSOs) in promoting and implementing anti-corruption reforms. Within the framework of the project, the capacity of CSOs and the media to engage in monitoring and watchdog activities will be improved.
The three-year project is funded by the European Union and implemented by the “Armenian Young Lawyers Association” NGO in cooperation with the “Freedom of Information Centre” NGO, with a total budget of €650,000.

Fight against Corruption in the System of Public Administration

On 29 April 2014, a working meeting was held in the “Picasso Hall” of the Best Western Hotel in Yerevan, aimed at discussing the “Presentation of the Concept on "Fight against Corruption in the System of Public Administration”” and at launching of the dialogue between the government and the civil society on the future strategy and its implementation. The meeting was organised by the “Freedom of Information Centre” NGO in cooperation with “Armenian Young Lawyers Association”. The President of the “Freedom of Information Centre”, Shushan Doydoyan, expressed her enthusiasm that the concept on “Fight against Corruption in the System of Public Administration" has finally been approved by the government. She was confident that this concept would serve as a huge step towards forming more effective civil society and strengthening democracy. The First Deputy Minister of Justice of the RA, Grigor Muradyan, said that this document would sum up transparency, openness and welfare activities undertaken during recent years, including over 50 laws and judicial statements. He went on to say that Armenia had registered noticeable progress in overcoming corruption, and that it now it occupied second place after Georgia in the Corruption Perception Index. The Head of the Cooperation Section of the EU Delegation in Armenia, Hoa-Binh Adjemian, said that the most important goal of this project was to build a strong economy and to fight poverty. He noted that fighting poverty was very high on the EU agenda, and that eliminating corruption was the first major step towards this it: ‘We want to ensure that EU money will help to improve the lives of people of Armenia. It is not meant to enrich a happy few, we rather want civil society to raise its capacity to monitor and advise the government’. Karen Zadoyan, the President of the “Armenian Young Lawyers Association”, said that they had done their best to ensure the theoretical components of the project. According to Zadoyan, the concept has three components: the first is to build an institute for maintaining the rights of people providing information; the second is the creation of single, independent anticorruption agency; the third is combating illegal enrichment in Armenia or discussing its possibility: ‘We need to calculate all possible risks and benefits in order to gain maximum efficiency’. The project is aimed at increasing the role of civil society organisations (CSOs) in promoting and implementing anti-corruption reforms. Within the framework of the project, the capacity of CSOs and the media to engage in monitoring and watchdog activities will be improved. The three-year project is funded by the European Union and implemented by the “Armenian Young Lawyers Association” NGO in cooperation with the “Freedom of Information Centre” NGO, with a total budget of €650,000.