Euroclubs now exist across Armenia | EUNewsletter

Euroclubs now exist across Armenia

22 November 2016
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In May 2016 the EU Delegation to Armenia launched the first Euroclub in Armenia. The Head of the EU Delegation to Armenia, Ambassador Świtalski, promised that Euroclubs would be opened in all Armenian marzes by the end of the year. This is now a reality.
On 22 November 2016 the last Euroclub in Armenia was established. The concept of Euroclubs started more than 25 years ago in Portugal, and spread to other EU member states and beyond. Euroclubs now exist across the EU and have been established in Eastern Partnership countries.
The idea behind the clubs is very simple; it is about offering a possibility for young people to gain access to information and to conduct conversations about Europe and European values and opportunities.

333333The main goals of Euroclubs in Armenia have been be to inform and educate young people about the EU and EU-Armenia issues, offer assistance in establishing long-term partnerships with European youth NGOs, apply for and obtain EU resources, and support Armenian youth’s aspirations to strengthen relations with the EU. The Delegation of the European Union in Armenia decided to launch this project to involve youth from all Armenian marzes and create equal opportunities. The very first Euroclub in Armenia was launched in Goris (Syunik marz); the second was in Yeghegnadzor (Vayots dzor marz). The third was recently established in the capital, Yerevan. Autumn 2016 then became a month for launching Euroclubs as, by end of October, Euroclubs had been set up in Dilijan (Tavush marz) and Armavir (Armavir marz). In November, even more were established in Gavar (Gegharkunik), Gyumri (Shirak marz), Vanadzor (Lori marz), Abovyan (Kotayk marz), Artashat (Ararat marz) and Ashtarak (Aragatsotn marz). All Euroclubs were established and are run with the assistance of a local partner organisation.
222222At the opening of the clubs, representatives from the EU, including the Ambassador himself, welcomed the club members and answered to their questions on the EU and EU-Armenia relations. Ambassador Świtalski highlighted that the existence of more Euroclubs was a symbol of the strong European identity of young Armenians: ‘Young Armenians want to stay in touch, have contact and engage in dialogue and cooperation with young people in other European countries; I don’t just mean the European Union. We believe that, through Euroclubs, Armenian youth, in particular those in the regions, will get additional possibilities to learn more about EU projects in Armenia and establish links with these projects. At these opening ceremonies I have spoken to participants who praise the youth activism behind these clubs’.

Euroclubs now exist across Armenia

In May 2016 the EU Delegation to Armenia launched the first Euroclub in Armenia. The Head of the EU Delegation to Armenia, Ambassador Świtalski, promised that Euroclubs would be opened in all Armenian marzes by the end of the year. This is now a reality. On 22 November 2016 the last Euroclub in Armenia was established. The concept of Euroclubs started more than 25 years ago in Portugal, and spread to other EU member states and beyond. Euroclubs now exist across the EU and have been established in Eastern Partnership countries. The idea behind the clubs is very simple; it is about offering a possibility for young people to gain access to information and to conduct conversations about Europe and European values and opportunities. 333333The main goals of Euroclubs in Armenia have been be to inform and educate young people about the EU and EU-Armenia issues, offer assistance in establishing long-term partnerships with European youth NGOs, apply for and obtain EU resources, and support Armenian youth’s aspirations to strengthen relations with the EU. The Delegation of the European Union in Armenia decided to launch this project to involve youth from all Armenian marzes and create equal opportunities. The very first Euroclub in Armenia was launched in Goris (Syunik marz); the second was in Yeghegnadzor (Vayots dzor marz). The third was recently established in the capital, Yerevan. Autumn 2016 then became a month for launching Euroclubs as, by end of October, Euroclubs had been set up in Dilijan (Tavush marz) and Armavir (Armavir marz). In November, even more were established in Gavar (Gegharkunik), Gyumri (Shirak marz), Vanadzor (Lori marz), Abovyan (Kotayk marz), Artashat (Ararat marz) and Ashtarak (Aragatsotn marz). All Euroclubs were established and are run with the assistance of a local partner organisation. 222222At the opening of the clubs, representatives from the EU, including the Ambassador himself, welcomed the club members and answered to their questions on the EU and EU-Armenia relations. Ambassador Świtalski highlighted that the existence of more Euroclubs was a symbol of the strong European identity of young Armenians: ‘Young Armenians want to stay in touch, have contact and engage in dialogue and cooperation with young people in other European countries; I don’t just mean the European Union. We believe that, through Euroclubs, Armenian youth, in particular those in the regions, will get additional possibilities to learn more about EU projects in Armenia and establish links with these projects. At these opening ceremonies I have spoken to participants who praise the youth activism behind these clubs’.