“Book Platform” project presented in Yerevan | EUNewsletter

“Book Platform” project presented in Yerevan

13 February 2013

A presentation on the “Book Platform” project, a cultural project supported by the EU, was given at the Khnko Aper National Children’s Library on 16 January in Armenia.
The project’s vision is in line with the overall objective of the Eastern Partnership Culture Programme, which is to promote the role of culture in the region’s sustainable development and regional cooperation among public institutions, civil society, cultural and academic organisations in the Eastern Partnership region and with the European Union.
The “Book Platform” is implemented by the Next Page Foundation, funded through the Eastern Partnership Culture Programme of the EU. Yana Genova, Director of the Next Page Foundation, presented the project and the work done in 2012, the year Armenia commemorated the 500th Anniversary of book publishing. She explained that the aim of the project was to develop cultural programmes concerning books, reading and translations: ‘Under the democratic development policy for the Eastern Partnership programme, the EU recently also included cultural programmes, so our project is aimed at promoting the cultural development in the countries of the Eastern Neighborhood. This is a project that has been realised in Armenia, Ukraine and Georgia for a year and will be going on for another one and a half years’.

In each country the project involves local partners. In Armenia the local partner is the Publishers Association.

A strong focus of the “Book Platform” capacity-building activities is placed on training events. The project foresees a total of nine training activities, of 2-3 days each involving both international and local trainers and co-trainers. There are also other activities planned, including editorial visits, which would entail 5-day working visits of up to 10 European and regional editors, publishers, and cultural journalists to the three project countries. Internships and several other projects are envisaged within the programme framework.

Ruzanna Tonoyan, Director of the Khnko Aper National Children’s Library, said that, according to the research done within the framework of this project, interest towards books had risen in 2012: ‘During the Soviet Union Armenia was considered the most literate nation. After the Union’s collapse there was low interest towards reading among Armenians, yet nowadays, with the help of this kind of project, progress is apparent’.

Since its establishment in 2001 Next Page has supported 271 book translations into 20 languages, has conducted 43 publishing and translation related studies, and has co-organised more than 20 events such as training events, seminars, public discussions, conferences, as well as other projects in its priority areas. The Foundation is based in Sofia, Bulgaria.

http://www.bookplatform.org/

“Book Platform” project presented in Yerevan

A presentation on the “Book Platform” project, a cultural project supported by the EU, was given at the Khnko Aper National Children’s Library on 16 January in Armenia. The project’s vision is in line with the overall objective of the Eastern Partnership Culture Programme, which is to promote the role of culture in the region's sustainable development and regional cooperation among public institutions, civil society, cultural and academic organisations in the Eastern Partnership region and with the European Union. The “Book Platform” is implemented by the Next Page Foundation, funded through the Eastern Partnership Culture Programme of the EU. Yana Genova, Director of the Next Page Foundation, presented the project and the work done in 2012, the year Armenia commemorated the 500th Anniversary of book publishing. She explained that the aim of the project was to develop cultural programmes concerning books, reading and translations: ‘Under the democratic development policy for the Eastern Partnership programme, the EU recently also included cultural programmes, so our project is aimed at promoting the cultural development in the countries of the Eastern Neighborhood. This is a project that has been realised in Armenia, Ukraine and Georgia for a year and will be going on for another one and a half years’. In each country the project involves local partners. In Armenia the local partner is the Publishers Association. A strong focus of the “Book Platform” capacity-building activities is placed on training events. The project foresees a total of nine training activities, of 2-3 days each involving both international and local trainers and co-trainers. There are also other activities planned, including editorial visits, which would entail 5-day working visits of up to 10 European and regional editors, publishers, and cultural journalists to the three project countries. Internships and several other projects are envisaged within the programme framework. Ruzanna Tonoyan, Director of the Khnko Aper National Children’s Library, said that, according to the research done within the framework of this project, interest towards books had risen in 2012: ‘During the Soviet Union Armenia was considered the most literate nation. After the Union’s collapse there was low interest towards reading among Armenians, yet nowadays, with the help of this kind of project, progress is apparent’. Since its establishment in 2001 Next Page has supported 271 book translations into 20 languages, has conducted 43 publishing and translation related studies, and has co-organised more than 20 events such as training events, seminars, public discussions, conferences, as well as other projects in its priority areas. The Foundation is based in Sofia, Bulgaria. http://www.bookplatform.org/