Better conditions for labour migrants | EUNewsletter

Better conditions for labour migrants

10 December 2013

On 29 November the International Centre for Human Development coordinated an EU-funded workshop entitled “Agreements on social welfare as an instrument to protect the social and labour rights of migrants”. The workshop was targeted at government agencies working on migration and labour rights, non-governmental organisations, and representatives from the private sector and international organisations.
The seminar was conducted by the Head of the International Cooperation Branch of the Ministry of Social Policy of Ukraine, Irina Roska, who gave a presentation on the interstate regulation of work permit issues, Ukraine’s experience in signing agreements, different types of agreements, targets and approaches, and benefits and mutual consensus between countries.
‘The goal of the seminar was to exchange experience with our Armenian partners on signing international agreements. This should result in the improvement of social and work conditions of the labour migrants,’ said Roska, sharing her experience in preparing international agreements with other countries on labour migration and the transferability of social rights of labour migrants.
The Deputy Director of the International Centre for Human Development, Armen Galstyan, talked about Armenian migration issues and about Ukraine’s experience: ‘Currently, many people are going abroad to work and, as a rule, they prefer to stay and work there illegally. We want to create motivations through the programme which will encourage migrants to prefer legal employment. One of those mechanisms is the transferability of social rights. Ukraine has signed a number of bilateral agreements with more 25 countries, including EU member states, which protect the rights of migrants. They are not losing their social history in their homeland and abroad, and work experience is accounted for citizens’ retirement. This formal legislation will hopefully curtail irregular migration.’
The Democratisation National Programme Officer in the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe Yerevan Office, Ovsanna Babayan, stated that agreements were crucial components in the regulation of labour migration, adding that Ukraine’s experience could be very instructive for Armenian agencies.
The workshop was organised within the framework of the “Strengthening Evidence-based Management of Labour Migration in Armenia” project, which is aimed at supporting the regulation of migration processes for Armenian labour migrants to EU countries. The project has a budget of €1,950,000.

Better conditions for labour migrants

On 29 November the International Centre for Human Development coordinated an EU-funded workshop entitled “Agreements on social welfare as an instrument to protect the social and labour rights of migrants”. The workshop was targeted at government agencies working on migration and labour rights, non-governmental organisations, and representatives from the private sector and international organisations. The seminar was conducted by the Head of the International Cooperation Branch of the Ministry of Social Policy of Ukraine, Irina Roska, who gave a presentation on the interstate regulation of work permit issues, Ukraine’s experience in signing agreements, different types of agreements, targets and approaches, and benefits and mutual consensus between countries. ‘The goal of the seminar was to exchange experience with our Armenian partners on signing international agreements. This should result in the improvement of social and work conditions of the labour migrants,’ said Roska, sharing her experience in preparing international agreements with other countries on labour migration and the transferability of social rights of labour migrants. The Deputy Director of the International Centre for Human Development, Armen Galstyan, talked about Armenian migration issues and about Ukraine’s experience: ‘Currently, many people are going abroad to work and, as a rule, they prefer to stay and work there illegally. We want to create motivations through the programme which will encourage migrants to prefer legal employment. One of those mechanisms is the transferability of social rights. Ukraine has signed a number of bilateral agreements with more 25 countries, including EU member states, which protect the rights of migrants. They are not losing their social history in their homeland and abroad, and work experience is accounted for citizens’ retirement. This formal legislation will hopefully curtail irregular migration.’ The Democratisation National Programme Officer in the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe Yerevan Office, Ovsanna Babayan, stated that agreements were crucial components in the regulation of labour migration, adding that Ukraine’s experience could be very instructive for Armenian agencies. The workshop was organised within the framework of the “Strengthening Evidence-based Management of Labour Migration in Armenia” project, which is aimed at supporting the regulation of migration processes for Armenian labour migrants to EU countries. The project has a budget of €1,950,000.