Armenia begins reforms on private international law | EUNewsletter

Armenia begins reforms on private international law

20 February 2014
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On 15 February 2014 the EU Advisory Group (EUAG), in cooperation with the Armenian Ministry of Justice, organised a roundtable discussion on the elaboration of private international law in Armenia.
This roundtable was organised as a result of the request by the Ministry of Justice for advice on the need to codify private international law through the adoption of a separate law or code on private international law, uniting provisions on private international law that are now spread among the Civil, Family, Labour, and Procedural Codes.
The discussion was aimed at providing insight on fundamental questions that could assist Armenia in amending legislation on private international law, highlighting problems in collision norms, conflicting legal institutions, international uniform laws, and improvement of the climate for Armenian foreign trade.
Charles Ehrlich, Advisor on Justice Reforms of EUAG, stated: ‘Work on private international law in Armenia has not yet begun, but it will this year and it is scheduled to be completed by December 2015. It is important for Armenia to carry out a fundamental review of its private international norms, codifying and elaborating where necessary in the Civil and Family Codes, as well as in other areas’.
The revision and elaboration of private international law will support the development of a legal regulatory framework for arbitration in Armenia. It is crucial that Armenian private law framework be harmonised with international standards and institutions on a broad range of issues, including family, labour, and intellectual property law.
The roundtable was moderated by Yeghishe Kirakosyan, Deputy Minister of Justice, who talked on the importance of the revision of private law: ‘The Ministry of Justice has also planned civil legislation reforms as part of its legal reform programme, including private international law. We will come closer and closer to completing full reforms of civil legislation by reforming it branch by branch’. The Ministry of Justice intends to form a working group on private international law in early 2014.
Marco Roccia of the University of Kent, Mushegh Manukyan of the American University in Armenia, and Armen Haykyants of Yerevan State University also gave speeches.

Armenia begins reforms on private international law

On 15 February 2014 the EU Advisory Group (EUAG), in cooperation with the Armenian Ministry of Justice, organised a roundtable discussion on the elaboration of private international law in Armenia. This roundtable was organised as a result of the request by the Ministry of Justice for advice on the need to codify private international law through the adoption of a separate law or code on private international law, uniting provisions on private international law that are now spread among the Civil, Family, Labour, and Procedural Codes. The discussion was aimed at providing insight on fundamental questions that could assist Armenia in amending legislation on private international law, highlighting problems in collision norms, conflicting legal institutions, international uniform laws, and improvement of the climate for Armenian foreign trade. Charles Ehrlich, Advisor on Justice Reforms of EUAG, stated: ‘Work on private international law in Armenia has not yet begun, but it will this year and it is scheduled to be completed by December 2015. It is important for Armenia to carry out a fundamental review of its private international norms, codifying and elaborating where necessary in the Civil and Family Codes, as well as in other areas’. The revision and elaboration of private international law will support the development of a legal regulatory framework for arbitration in Armenia. It is crucial that Armenian private law framework be harmonised with international standards and institutions on a broad range of issues, including family, labour, and intellectual property law. The roundtable was moderated by Yeghishe Kirakosyan, Deputy Minister of Justice, who talked on the importance of the revision of private law: ‘The Ministry of Justice has also planned civil legislation reforms as part of its legal reform programme, including private international law. We will come closer and closer to completing full reforms of civil legislation by reforming it branch by branch’. The Ministry of Justice intends to form a working group on private international law in early 2014. Marco Roccia of the University of Kent, Mushegh Manukyan of the American University in Armenia, and Armen Haykyants of Yerevan State University also gave speeches.