Anti-corruption mechanisms and safeguards are examined | EUNewsletter

Anti-corruption mechanisms and safeguards are examined

2 May 2015
2Z4A0097

The National Integrity System Assessment Armenia 2014 report was released on 30 April 2015. It presents the findings and results of the “National Integrity System Assessments in the European Neighbourhood East Region” regional project, coordinated by the Transparency International secretariat and funded by the EU to the amount of €756,129. The Transparency International Anti-corruption Centre is the official accredited chapter of Transparency International in Armenia, and it produced a comprehensive national integrity system report, which includes examinations of anti-corruption mechanisms and safeguards across 13 institutions in Armenia.
2Z4A0115A welcoming speech was given on the event by the Head of the EU Delegation to Armenia, Ambassador Traian Hristea: ‘No country or region is free from corruption, and Armenia is no exception. Corruption is strongly correlated with the underdevelopment of a country and refers not only to economic, but also to political consequences. The EU is committed to supporting governments to fight against corruption in many countries around the world – that includes Armenia and EU member states. But to be successful, Armenia also needs to show willing and take the initiative – there is a need for political commitment, because the efforts by civil society, international actors and donors will be in vain without it’.
The report examined 13 institutions of the Armenian national integrity system (NIS), including: the legislature, the president’s office, the executive, the judiciary, the civil service, law-enforcement agencies, the central electoral commission, the human rights defender’s office, the chamber of control, political parties, media, civil society, and business. The major findings of the study are:
• Despite having sufficiently well formulated anti-corruption legislation, there are serious shortcomings in its effective implementation
• The judiciary remains corrupt and not free from the influence of the authorities
• Prosecution for corruption-related crimes is alarmingly low
• Civil society and media remain very weak as watchdogs against corruption. They need fundamental reforms to become effective pillars of the Armenian NIS, etc.
Based on these and other findings, numerous recommendations aimed at strengthening the Armenian NIS are included in the report.
Suren Krmoyan, Armenian Deputy Minister of Justice, thanked the EU and other international organisations for their continuing investment in the fight against corruption in Armenia: ‘Prevention of corruption and cooperation with society are our main goals. The government realises the dangers of corruption for the economic development of the country, and we are sure that efforts in the fight against corruption will have positive outcomes. After that, we will have the opportunity not only to talk about how to fight against corruption but also to discuss how we decrease its prevalence’.

Anti-corruption mechanisms and safeguards are examined

The National Integrity System Assessment Armenia 2014 report was released on 30 April 2015. It presents the findings and results of the “National Integrity System Assessments in the European Neighbourhood East Region” regional project, coordinated by the Transparency International secretariat and funded by the EU to the amount of €756,129. The Transparency International Anti-corruption Centre is the official accredited chapter of Transparency International in Armenia, and it produced a comprehensive national integrity system report, which includes examinations of anti-corruption mechanisms and safeguards across 13 institutions in Armenia. 2Z4A0115A welcoming speech was given on the event by the Head of the EU Delegation to Armenia, Ambassador Traian Hristea: ‘No country or region is free from corruption, and Armenia is no exception. Corruption is strongly correlated with the underdevelopment of a country and refers not only to economic, but also to political consequences. The EU is committed to supporting governments to fight against corruption in many countries around the world – that includes Armenia and EU member states. But to be successful, Armenia also needs to show willing and take the initiative – there is a need for political commitment, because the efforts by civil society, international actors and donors will be in vain without it’. The report examined 13 institutions of the Armenian national integrity system (NIS), including: the legislature, the president’s office, the executive, the judiciary, the civil service, law-enforcement agencies, the central electoral commission, the human rights defender’s office, the chamber of control, political parties, media, civil society, and business. The major findings of the study are: • Despite having sufficiently well formulated anti-corruption legislation, there are serious shortcomings in its effective implementation • The judiciary remains corrupt and not free from the influence of the authorities • Prosecution for corruption-related crimes is alarmingly low • Civil society and media remain very weak as watchdogs against corruption. They need fundamental reforms to become effective pillars of the Armenian NIS, etc. Based on these and other findings, numerous recommendations aimed at strengthening the Armenian NIS are included in the report. Suren Krmoyan, Armenian Deputy Minister of Justice, thanked the EU and other international organisations for their continuing investment in the fight against corruption in Armenia: ‘Prevention of corruption and cooperation with society are our main goals. The government realises the dangers of corruption for the economic development of the country, and we are sure that efforts in the fight against corruption will have positive outcomes. After that, we will have the opportunity not only to talk about how to fight against corruption but also to discuss how we decrease its prevalence’.