Anti-corruption Game | EUNewsletter

Anti-corruption Game

18 December 2015
ARS_0260

The Head of the EU Delegation to Armenia, Ambassador Piotr Antoni Świtalski, and other representatives from the EU Delegation attended an event to mark the creation of an anti-corruption game. The event took place at the TUMO centre for creative technologies on 16 December 2015. The event took place in the cinema hall; however, to reach it, guests had to participate in the game. The aim of the game was to choose a shorter path by “paying” with pins or to go the long way round by not giving anything. However, those who chose the “corrupt” way reached the end later than others.
ARS_0272Ambassador Świtalski gave some advice to the youngsters from TUMO: ‘I am here because the fight against corruption is important for the EU; the EU is dedicated to helping Armenia overcome this problem. Corruption is one of the most serious structural problems for Armenia and, if it is not solved, Armenia will not be able to develop and move forward. Today we explore an innovative approach to fighting corruption and I am very happy that my colleagues have initiated this cooperation with TUMO. I think it is very important that we’ve started with young people, because, from an early age, children and teenagers see how their parents first pay bribes at school, then at university for a diploma, then to find a job. They see that it’s bad, but everyone does it. By engaging young people we will have very positive results. Armenia is a country with huge potential and lot of this potential is unused because of corruption. Let’s make a change – we are here to help you to make that change, but it’s you who have to do it!’
TUMO board member Pegor Papazian stated that the project will be sponsored by the EU and implemented by TUMO: ‘This project will involve a game and animation accompanied by a dedicated website. The aim of the game will be to raise awareness, especially among young people, regarding the risks presented by different types of corruption and the value and rewards of resisting corruption as an investment in long-term personal and societal prosperity’.
After the opening speeches, young people had the opportunity to ask Ambassador Świtalski questions, which opened up dialogue on corruption and ways to combat it.

Anti-corruption Game

The Head of the EU Delegation to Armenia, Ambassador Piotr Antoni Świtalski, and other representatives from the EU Delegation attended an event to mark the creation of an anti-corruption game. The event took place at the TUMO centre for creative technologies on 16 December 2015. The event took place in the cinema hall; however, to reach it, guests had to participate in the game. The aim of the game was to choose a shorter path by “paying” with pins or to go the long way round by not giving anything. However, those who chose the “corrupt” way reached the end later than others. ARS_0272Ambassador Świtalski gave some advice to the youngsters from TUMO: 'I am here because the fight against corruption is important for the EU; the EU is dedicated to helping Armenia overcome this problem. Corruption is one of the most serious structural problems for Armenia and, if it is not solved, Armenia will not be able to develop and move forward. Today we explore an innovative approach to fighting corruption and I am very happy that my colleagues have initiated this cooperation with TUMO. I think it is very important that we’ve started with young people, because, from an early age, children and teenagers see how their parents first pay bribes at school, then at university for a diploma, then to find a job. They see that it's bad, but everyone does it. By engaging young people we will have very positive results. Armenia is a country with huge potential and lot of this potential is unused because of corruption. Let's make a change – we are here to help you to make that change, but it's you who have to do it!' TUMO board member Pegor Papazian stated that the project will be sponsored by the EU and implemented by TUMO: ‘This project will involve a game and animation accompanied by a dedicated website. The aim of the game will be to raise awareness, especially among young people, regarding the risks presented by different types of corruption and the value and rewards of resisting corruption as an investment in long-term personal and societal prosperity’. After the opening speeches, young people had the opportunity to ask Ambassador Świtalski questions, which opened up dialogue on corruption and ways to combat it.